• WILD VIBRATIONS

    The “Wild Vibrations” carpet is a tribal and secessionist inspiration, it depicts the banks of a fierce river with heady reflections and swirls.

    Design by: Sacha Walckhoff

  • wild vibrations by Sacha Walckhoff View
    WV3.01
  • TOUCH THE SKY

    Above is below and below is above. By using a modern twist on this ceiling fresco Magnus plays with inverting the perspectives.

    Design by: Magnus Gjoen

  • View
    TS3.01
  • STACKED-UP

    Industrial memorabilia that gives importance to what most people would not pay attention to or would not see as interesting but converts it into a graphic element that transcends the value of the object highlighted. The collection plays in almost an ironic manner with this layering and three-dimensional logic that has now become quite common in a lot of rug designs. It gives the impression that the stack of corrugated metal sheets featured at the center of the rug is real, that it has a real depth. This three-dimensional effect will vary depending on the angle it is viewed from.

    Design by: Alain Gilles

  • View
    ST3.01
  • View
    ST3.02
  • View
    ST3.03
  • View
    ST3.04
  • PARADISO

    The rug depicts an imaginary landscape where nature plays with geometrical shapes. Some birds fly through this mysterious landscape. Balancing realism with abstraction, this series of 3 colorways melds meticulous detail of botanical with free geometrical forms.

    Design by: Charlotte Juillard

  • View
    PR3.01
  • PLUME

    The freedom of floating in mid-air with the power of a pair of delicate tools. A cluster of softness, an armour of colours and textures, a cloak to allure and protect.
    A close-up, macro view of delicate feather forms is the inspiration behind the Plume collection of rugs.
    The colour schemes chosen carefully to evoke a premium and timeless quality while at the same time they abide by a contemporary design aesthetic. Delicate lines layered over block colours create vibrant or softer contrasts and the density of their repetition creates eye catching

    Design by: StudioLav

  • View
    PL3.03
  • View
    PL3.02
  • View
    PL3.04
  • View
    PL3.01
  • HOLE

    The Hole collection plays with perception and perspective and gives the impression of an opening, a gateway to somewhere else; a very modern “trompe l’oeil”. It is created by the combination of two separate elements. A grid is composed of hand-sketched lines and a round graphic element which from certain angles will give the impression of an opening in the ground. The grid illustrates the idea of a floor. A reference to a surreal and more playful cartoonish world.

    Design by: Alain Gilles

  • View
    HO3.01
  • ANTIQUE TERMS

    Abstract forms of pattern and smooth shading promotes an idea of high-end quality designs that create an aesthetically beautiful harmony. Faded shapes, pale colors, and gradient shading are mostly used in this collection.

    Design by: Elena Georghiadou

  • View
    AT3.02
  • View
    AT3.04
  • View
    AT3.03
  • View
    AT3.01
  • BIOPHILIC PORTALS

    Biophilia, according to a theory of the biologist E.O. Wilson, is an innate and genetically determined affinity of human beings with the natural world. With these rugs, we imagine ourselves in a new interior of a house amongst the trees, from which we gaze upon the future green city. A forest of utopic perfection where human beings and nature coexist in symbiosis in peace and balance.

    Design by: Lanzaveccia + Wai

  • View
    BP3.01
  • ZEPHYR

    A sense of limitless horizon is what this collection suggests. Treated as an abstract landscape made of large moving areas, the colors are superimposed and impregnate with solar warmth to conjure different moments of the day from dawn to dusk.

    Design by: Amellie Lengrand

  • View
    ZE3.01
  • View
    ZE3.04
  • View
    ZE3.02
  • View
    ZE3.03
  • CITY

    With City rug we tried to put under our feet the perspective of an Italian Renaissance square with its buildings and its bell tower. A small Pienza, one of the most important examples of Italian 15th century town planning.

    Design by: Bellavista & Piccini

  • View
    CI3.01